The Credo Restored.: William Fulbright’s The Arrogance of Power (1966) urged a rethinking of the Washington rules, the U.S. had become “a militaristic and aggressive nation”

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Ch. 3: The Credo Restored.
 
William Fulbright’s The Arrogance of Power (1966) urged a rethinking of the Washington rules (109-15). A radicalized David Shoup, a Medal of Honor winner and former commandant of the MarineCorps, argued in “The New American Militarism” (Atlantic, April 1969) that the U.S. had become “a militaristic and aggressive nation” (120; 115-21). The 1960s Zeitgeist shift made LeMay “an embarrassment, mocked and vilified rather than venerated,” which showed that the Washington rules had incurred serious damage in Vietnam; the Army was in dire shape (122; 121-27).
Yet astonishingly, in the subsequent decade the “sacred trinity” (cf. 11-15) was “fully restored” (127). As in post-1918 Germany, élites looked for scapegoats and worked to reverse “the war’s apparent verdict” (128). The Council on Foreign Relations 1976 volume entitled The Vietnam Legacy: The War, American Society, and the Future of American Foreign Policy is an expression of élite consensus that the Vietnam war was insignificant, an anomaly (129-34).
By 1980, Democrats and Republicans were again on the same page (134-36).Reagan’s election “sealed the triumph of Vietnam revisionism” (136; 136-38). And the end of the Cold War posed no challenge to the Washington rules, as Madeleine Albright’s pretentious arrogance exemplifies (138-45).
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