Progress made in developing North Korean rich mineral resources

Progress made in developing North Korean rich mineral resources

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Published on Jul 30, 2015

North Korea, South Hamgyong Province – December 6, 2011
1. Wide of underground drilling for Magnesite (magnesiunm carbonate) mining
2. Close-up of drill going in to rock face
3. Mid of mine workers operating drilling vehicle
4. Mid of bucket of loader vehicle picking up rocks containing magnesite
5. Mid of mine worker in cabin of loader vehicle moving rocks
6. Wide of loader vehicle putting rocks into transport truck
7. Wide pan of transport truck driving away done mine passage
8. Wide pan of transport truck unloading rocks into chute going to conveyor belt out of mine
9. Wide of piles of sacks of light-burned magnesia powder
10. Close-up of sack of light-burned magnesia with words in English “DPR.Korea KMCIG”
11. Wide exterior of Tanchon Area Mining General Bureau building
12. Sign of Tanchon Area Mining General Bureau in Korean above building entrance
13. SOUNDBITE: (Korean) Om Jin Su, First Vice General Bureau Director, Tanchon Area Mining General Bureau:
“As the world acknowledges, there are abundant deposits of lead and zinc ores and billions of tons of magnesite ores in the Tanchon area at present. Also, in terms of quality of magnesite ore, it has high content of magnesium oxide and less impurities. Also because of good mining conditions, promising mines which can produce in large quantity without too much investment, are in full production, now.”
14. Wide high shot of mountainside with Komdok mine facilities
15. Wide of mine workers walking along tunnel underground at Komdok mine
16. Wide of mine workers drilling into rock face for lead and zinc
17. Close-up of drill going into rock face
18. Close-up of mine worker while drilling into rock face
19. Wide of mine workers drilling into rock face
20. Wide of conveyor belt carrying containers of rocks out of mine
21. Wide of flotation plant for separating lead and zinc from crushed rocks
22. Mid tilt down of liquid and machinery separating lead and zinc from crushed rocks
23. SOUNDBITE: (Korean) Om Jin Su, First Vice General Bureau Director, Tanchon Area Mining General Bureau:
“We cooperate with different investors around the world, and we are making every effort to work for increasing productivity and to export more products. In line with modern development and in the future, too, we hope to produce more and export more by strengthening exchanges with other countries.”
24. Wide pan of exterior of lead and zinc refinery
25. Wide of interior of lead and zinc refinery
26. Close of molten zinc coming out of pipe
27. Wide pan of molten zinc going down spout to moulds for making ingots
28. Close of worker skimming skin off cooling zinc ingot
29. Wide pan and tilt down as worker removes cooled zinc ingot from mould and puts it on pile of ingots
30. Wide pan of forklift truck moving stack of zinc ingots and pan and tilt down to stacks of zinc ingots
LEADIN:
North Korea is a desperately poor country, but it has rich resources of minerals.
It’s trying to develop its mining sector as part of efforts to kick start its economy in 2012, when it will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of its founding leader, Kim Il Sung.
The death of Kim Jong Il, who ruled the country until December last year, has not put a halt to North Korea’s attempts to revitalise its economy.
STORYLINE:
Tunnels into the mountainsides of North Korea lead to mines packed with valuable minerals – and industries around the world need them.
The northern part of the Korean peninsula was traditionally strong in mining, with the southern part stronger in agriculture.
One of areas that North Korea is trying to promote is around Tanchon, in South Hamgyong province, on its east coast.
But that was in 2006, and nothing has come of it since.

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